A Baltimore boy who gave his life for his country

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John Harrison Lambert
December 13, 1888 – September 26, 1918

Private 1st Class John Harrison Lambert gave his life for his country on September 26, 1918, during the World War I epic battle for Montfaucon, a part of the Meuse-Argonne offensive. John Lambert served in the 313th Infantry Regiment, 79th Division, “Baltimore’s Own,” Company F, composed mostly of men from Baltimore City’s 10th Ward. Company F soldiers called themselves “The Irish Fusiliers.” Lambert served as a rifleman armed with a Browning Automatic Rifle (BAR.)

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Lambert was mortally wounded while flanking a German machine gun nest as the 313th pushed toward Montfaucon. He was buried in an American cemetery in France.

Before the war, John Lambert was employed as a moving picture operator at a theater located on Pennsylvania Avenue. 

He also was a musician and composed One Last Good-bye shortly before his death. The Department of Maryland Veterans of Foreign Wars adopted it as their official song in 1921.

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Private 1st Class John Harrison Lambert wore a patch like this as part of Company F, 313th Infantry, 79th Division

Private 1st Class John Harrison Lambert wore a patch like this as part of Company F, 313th Infantry, 79th Division

The body of John Harrison Lambert was returned to Baltimore in 1921 and buried in Western Cemetery. Representatives of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, Gold Star Mothers, the 313th Montfaucon Club and the entire Moving Picture Operators Union attended the funeral.

About 62,000 Marylanders served in World War I and over 1,700 soldiers were killed.

Bibliography and more reading:

  1. The Baltimore Sun, September 4, 1921

  2. Tompkins, Raymond S., Maryland Fighters In The Great War: Baltimore, Thomas & Evans Printing Co., 1919.